LET'S CONNECT

While the Garden may be closed temporarily, we invite you to stay connected with us through our digital resources.

READ AND WATCH

Catch up with the Dow Gardens team!

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Herbert Dow's Garden Journals

Get a glimpse of Herbert H. Dow's Garden journals and what we can learn from the entries, today.

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About Arborists

Learn about the talented individuals who help care for the many trees that grow throughout the 110-acre Dow Gardens.

4. White Pines at Hartwick Pines State Park

Arbor Day: A Celebration of Trees

Trees are essential to all life on planet Earth. They produce oxygen, store carbon, stabilize the soil, and offer food and homes for wildlife.

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Our Favorite Tools

We are often asked, "What is your favorite garden tool and why?" Check out this list of our top seven!

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Pruning Basics

Senior Horticulturist Chuck Martin reviews the "how, why, where, and when" of pruning.

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5 Annuals We are Excited about in 2020

Wondering which summer annuals to add to your landscape? Check out these five standout varieties!

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Bee Blog

If the thought of becoming a backyard beekeeper is attractive to you, or you'd just like a peek into our amazing hives, this blog is an excellent place to start.

KEEP KIDS GROWING

Fun Resources for Learning and Engagement!

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Printable Field Journal

Download our free printable field journal (PDF), and be a scientist in your own backyard!

CONNECT WITH US

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GET GARDENING HELP

Follow us on Facebook as we answer your Spring gardening questions, and be sure to follow us on Instagram for photos and more.

VIRTUAL PUZZLES

Have some free time on your hands? Click the images below to complete a garden puzzle!

SIGNS OF SPRING

Herbert H. Dow’s planting journals include daily observations of nature in every season. This week, he particularly noticed woodland wildflowers which are still common in Michigan. These beauties take advantage of warm weather, spring rain, and available sunlight before the tree canopy leafs out and shades the forest floor. Don't miss your chance to see them while they last!

Spring Beauty opens on warm sunny days and closes at night. The hardy little plant is abundant in Michigan and one of our earliest wildflowers of spring.

Even before it blossoms, Yellow Trout-lily is easy recognizable by its brown mottled leaves, vaguely resembling markings of brown or brook trout. This common wildflower often grows in large colonies.

Dutchman's Breeches resemble tiny pantaloons hanging upside down. This charismatic little flower prefers moist soil and some shade.

When Bloodroot is cut, its rhizome (underground stem) secretes a red fluid that gives the plant its name. Long harvested by herbalists for use in medicine, it was also a common ingredient of 19th century "quack" remedies.